cntryboy0611:

cntryboy0611:

Yea I could love here for sure

Live damnit not love… Well I could do that too but I meant live!!

(Source: natureb0ner, via disgruntleddoc)

"please be as weird as me please be as weird as me please be as weird as me"

— me every time I meet someone (via miel-lapin)

(via matthewgraygublet)

house-mouse:

nubbsgalore:

the timid european ground squirrel, stopping to smell the daisies, photographed in vienna by julian rad, who explains, “you have to be at eye level with the squirrels. that means you have to lay on your stomach for quite a few hours in order to get them in front of your lens. you have to make yourself invisible. it is important that they have no indication you are there.” (see also: more precious lil woodland buddies)

EEEP

nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)

(via findwhatyouare)

awwww-cute:

We were worried they wouldn’t get along

awwww-cute:

We were worried they wouldn’t get along

(via otherlifelessons)

joshpeckofficial:

puppies are touchable happiness 

(via disgruntleddoc)

designcloud:

The Abyss Table by Duffy London

This mesmerising table was first conceived by Christopher Duffy — and ultimately refined by the team at Duffy London — to represent a 3D geological map of an ocean floor. The Abyss Table makes use of contour lines, which are often used to denote topography in terrain maps, to render an island chain and ocean abyss.

Contour lines can be thought of as workaround for the 2D limitations of paper maps, but Duffy instead relished these simplifications which have become iconic imagery for the field of cartography. He incorporates layers of wood to represent the land, and panes of glass for the water, in order to produce a 3 dimensional geographical model.

(via Homeli)

(via findwhatyouare)